Tüzel Group

News

Digital Confocal Microscopy Suite (DCMS) is now available for free!

For more information click here.

Our new sperm sorting device (patent pending) is now licensed!

New paper provides a novel approach for monitoring neutropenia for cancer patients.

To read the paper click here.

New paper in Nature Communications uncovers the role of optimal stiffness for cell migration.

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FUNDING

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Journal Covers

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"Exhaustion of racing sperm in nature-mimicking microfluidic channels during sorting”, H. Safaee, X. Zhang, S. Tasoglu, J. L. Kingsley, P. N. Catalano, U. A. Gurkan, A. Nureddin, E. Kayaalp, R. M. Anchan, R. L. Maas, E. Tüzel*, U. Demirci*, Small 9, 33743384 (2013). co-corresponding authors. (inside cover)

Abstract:
Capillary waves have been observed in systems ranging from the surfaces of ordinary fluids to interfaces in biological membranes and have been one of the most studied areas in the physics of fluids. Recent advances in fluorescence microscopy and imaging enabled quantitative measurements of thermally driven capillary waves in lipid monolayers and bilayers, which resulted in accurate measurements of the line tension in monolayer domains. Even though there has been a considerable amount of work on the statics and dynamics of capillary waves in three dimensions, to the best of our knowledge, there is no detailed theoretical analysis for two-dimensional droplet morphologies. In this paper, we derive the dynamic correlation function for two-dimensional fluid droplets using linear response theory and verify our results using a novel particle-based simulation technique for binary mixtures.



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"Dynamics of thermally-driven capillary waves for two-dimensional droplets", E. Tüzel, G. Pan and D. M. Kroll, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 174701 (2010). (cover)

Abstract:
Capillary waves have been observed in systems ranging from the surfaces of ordinary fluids to interfaces in biological membranes and have been one of the most studied areas in the physics of fluids. Recent advances in fluorescence microscopy and imaging enabled quantitative measurements of thermally driven capillary waves in lipid monolayers and bilayers, which resulted in accurate measurements of the line tension in monolayer domains. Even though there has been a considerable amount of work on the statics and dynamics of capillary waves in three dimensions, to the best of our knowledge, there is no detailed theoretical analysis for two-dimensional droplet morphologies. In this paper, we derive the dynamic correlation function for two-dimensional fluid droplets using linear response theory and verify our results using a novel particle-based simulation technique for binary mixtures.